The stimulus bill that passed in late March, known as the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act or CARES Act, earmarks $30.7 billion under an Education Stabilization Fund for states to spend on education, including $13.2 billion for the Elementary and Secondary School Education Relief Fund and $14 billion for Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund. Another $3 billion goes to the Governors Emergency Education Relief Fund, which governors can use for “significantly impacted” school districts or higher education institutions.

“Technology investments are not one time expenses. Once a vision for the use of technology is in place, district superintendents and school leaders should examine existing budgets to identify areas in which spending can be reduced or eliminated to pay for learning technologies.” says The Office of Educational Technology, part of the US Department of Education.

The U.S. Department of Education Office of Educational Technology (OET) develops national educational technology policy and establishes the vision for how technology can be used to transform teaching and learning and how to make everywhere, all-the-time learning possible for early learners through K-12, higher education, and adult education

Today, we’ll talk about some of these funding options and how schools may be able to use these funds to spend on technology to enable students to learn remotely.